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Wild Card Words

Unlike the past entries, today’s words come from three different books rather than the same book. Definitions are from the Oxford English Dictionary.

mien


From Ask Me About My Uterus by Abby Norman: “There was a softness about her blond, blue-eyed mien” (61).


Definition: noun, the look, bearing, manner, or conduct of a person, as showing character, mood, etc.


Despite the bad-temper redhead stereotype, my smiling mien communicates friendliness.

dilettante


From Future Home of the Living God by Louise Erdrich: “A woman, a dweeb, a geek, a pregnant degreeless dilettante straddling not just millennia but epochs” (66).


Definition: noun, a lover of the fine arts, originally, one who cultivates them for the love of them rather than professionally, and so amateur as opposed to professional; but later in use generally applied more or less depreciatively to one who interests himself in an art or science merely as a pastime and without serious aim or study


As a person new to blogging I occasionally feel like a dilettante compared to all the experts who can boast of polished, monetized book blogs.

obviate


From Trick Mirror by Jia Tolentino: “It hopes to obviate the harm done to ordinary women in a culture that loves to watch female celebrities melt down” (242).


Definition: verb, to prevent or avoid by anticipatory measures


I tidy a little every day in order to obviate the chaos of a messy living space.

Tell me what words you have learned from your reading! Share in the comments below.

 
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