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Wordy Wednesday No. 22

Hello and happy Wordy Wednesday!


Today’s words come from a novel entitled Woman No. 17 by Edan Lepucki. The story follows a recent college grad who goes by S (short for Esther) as she reinvents herself within her new job nannying for the child of a woman named Lady. 


Turning the pages is like peeling away the layers that bring the reader closer and closer to the core of these two women. As they grow increasingly vulnerable with each other, they forge a mother-daughter bond that they’ve each yearned for and never had. Yet within this connection their individual dysfunctions prevail, and I wonder when (it has to be when, not if) the illusory relationship they’ve created will break. And what will each of them do in the fallout?



You know the drill: I share words that I found from the book, including the sentence in which I found them. Then I give the Oxford definition. Finally, to take ownership of the word I make up a sentence using it. I encourage you to give it a try in the comments! 


hale


“He was tall—six foot three, easy—and thin, but not macrobiotic-thin like so many of the bike-riding boomers in Berkeley[. …] He was hale, as my dad might say” (56).


Adjective: (of a person, especially an elderly one) strong and healthy.


After the graduation ceremony I ushered my family up Brady hill to tour the Palmer mansion. As hale as my Nana is, the trek was nearly too much for her. 


lecher


“The South Dakotan lawyer, that leering bed hogger: what a lecher” (127).


Noun: a man having or showing excessive or offensive sexual desire.


I shudder to think of my college days on okcupid searching for a decent guy to date and only finding lechers.


harridan


“A woman who was as flawless as a model, but who was probably a jewelry-designer, gave her boyfriend a look like: Check out the harridan with the latte” (133).


Noun: a strict, bossy, or belligerent old woman.


Even worse than to be called a nag or a shrew is to be dubbed a harridan


Thanks for joining me for Wordy Wednesday. Until next week, happy reading!

 
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